Posted in BLOG, WORKING ARTISTS

Homesteading Artist Problems

Problem #1: ITS EARLY SPRING.  Prepare the gardens for planting.   Summer squash, tomatoes and vibrant annual flowers.  Trimming back climbing ivy.  More time spent outdoors than indoors.  “Mmm.  I’ll have to do art later.  Then I can post it on my blog.”

Problem #2: ITS LATE SPRING.  Roasting peanuts.  Fighting garden slugs and weeds in the garden.  Lots of rain keeps the grass growing.  First family vacation in 7 years.  Visiting our favorite coastal Georgia island.  “Great!  I’ll do some sketches.  They will make great studies for a finished piece.  Then I can post it on my blog.”

Problem #3: ITS SUMMER.  Finding great mark-downs on produce.  Put away several pints of peach preserves.  Harvest 14 quarts of squash.  Blanched and frozen.  Picking horn worms off tomatoes struggling through neglect and scorching summer heat.  Time for planting okra.  “Ahh!  Maybe the garden will inspire me to make art.  Then I can post it on my blog.”  

I know you are still waiting to see all those sketches.

Me too.

Found this short video about artist Clare Carver of Big Table Farm in Gaston, Oregon.   Carver’s work on the farm is what inspires her creations.  Great idea.  Now if I can set aside some time for art…

View more of Carver’s work at Clarecarver.com.

Featured Image credit: Freeimages.com/Witold Barski
Posted in WORKING ARTISTS

Artistic Collaboration: Luke Buffenmyer and Megan McNaught

It has often been said that Art Curators are simply frustrated artists.  Been there.  Felt that.  Got the t-shirt, coffee mug and tote bag!  Danielle Krysa of The Jealous Curator blog would agree.  On the other hand, Megan McNaught might not.

McNaught is the Curator of The Gallery at Macon Arts Alliance (Macon, Georgia). She has access to a list of more than 200 regional artists for exhibitions.  And submissions keep pouring in.  A prolific artist in her own right, McNaught has no cause for ‘jealousy’ or frustration.’ Rather she welcomes other artists to collaborate with her in the creative process.

She writes in her artist statement: “Collaborating for me has been a…creative springboard to new and exciting work.  Starting an image and handing it off to be finished, or being given an image to finish is intimidating, daunting and requires brave actions…expanding a creative process beyond oneself.”

A wonderful juxtaposition of artistic styles occur when McNaught collaborates with artist Luke Buffenmyer. Whereas McNaught work is a deliberate use of restrictions and rules, Buffenmyer’s allegorical images are a collection of memories and emotions.

Want to see more of their work?

meganmcnaught.blogspot.com

heragallery.org/luke-buffenmyer

Or visit the Emerging Artists group exhibition (Museum of Arts and Sciences, Macon, Georgia) through May 7, 2017.

 

Posted in WORKING ARTISTS

Painting: Michael Ross

“Hey!  This one looks like its in 3-D.”  This comment by a fellow museum visitor piqued my curiosity while viewing Emerging Artists (Museum of Arts and Sciences, Macon, Georgia). Optical art was not among the contemporary work.  Missing were strategically placed lighting effects.  Yet Michael Ross’ canvases were aglow with activity, color and light.

Ross notes in his artist’s statement:

‘The figures in my paintings are on the move.  They exist in transient flux but have a sense of mission: a decision is looming, an obstacle lies ahead that will leave them changed…Like a film director, I want to create  worlds [that] must feel real and lived, if heightened and cinematic. ‘

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Waxwing in a New Forest.  Image from Emerging Artists exhibit Museum of Arts and Sciences (Macon, Georgia)

Despite all this drama, it was Ross’s quiet lush landscapes that kept me captivated at the exhibition.  His oil painting Waxwing in a New Forest simmers with the thick humidity of the South.  The transplanted Marylander has embraced his new home “with all its beauty and tragedy.”

 Want to see more of Michael Ross work?

michaelrossart.com

Posted in WORKING ARTISTS

Ceramics: Ester Lipscomb

In her bio Ester Lipscomb describes herself as “a studio potter working in northeast Georgia.”  A humble understatement from such a sophisticated ceramicist!

Perhaps having a close connection to the earth, or owning a pet dog named Loretta Lynn is what grounds this dynamic artist.

mark-of-the-potter-landscape
Northeast Georgia, US markofthepotter.com

Lipscomb muses “Living in these beautiful mountains gives me the opportunity to enjoy the daily flow of nature and the seasons.  I am inspired to create objects that I hope are part of the landscape.” True to their maker’s sensibilities her work has a natural ebb and flow taking on bulbous organic forms.

I was recently introduced to Lipscomb’s work at the Emerging Artists exhibit – Museum of Arts and Sciences (Macon, Georgia).  This annual event features 7 contemporary artists from around the Southeast whose work is of exceptional caliber.  Over the next few weeks, I’ll spotlight their art.

Want to see more of Ester Lipscomb’s work?